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Replacing the Wood on the Cockpit seats.

Replacing the Wood on the Cockpit seats.

Postby Petef » Tue Jul 26, 2016 11:51 pm

Has anyone tried to replace the wood (Teak faced Plywood) on the cockpit seating?
Mine is starting to look a bit tatty, flaking and the black rubber striping is almost gone.
I can get replacement rubber striping, but was wondering if it is possible to replace the the plywood and if so how easy/hard is it?
Has anyone done this, what is the best way to do it? Or how about the artificial stuff, is it worth considering using that?

Kind Regards

Petef
Petef
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jul 02, 2013 2:55 pm
Boat type: Dehler 39 J&V

Re: Replacing the Wood on the Cockpit seats.

Postby Petef » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:24 am

So we were getting splinters from the original Teak faced Plywood on the cockpit seating. Started to look around for a replacement. There are a couple of boats that have the artificial teak in their cockpits etc. They look quite nice so went to the local dealer for a quote, and to just supply the panels for the seats came to over £2500 plus the glue. We would have to remove the old stuff and stick the panels down or the price would be another couple of thousands! Checked on the internet and found that Moody's could supply real teak strips 45x10.5 by whatever length we needed, the epoxy glue and the recommended Teak deck caulking (TDS SIS 440) for less than £1000. Set to removing the old seating, which took some time using a chisel and then one of those electric multi tools with the scraper/slicer attachment. Removed all traces of the original glue (which was still tacky) and cleaned with Acetone, roughed the surface with some 80 grit sandpaper to give the epoxy a key. The locker lids I took home and did them there. I also had to fashion a couple of curved bits of teak for where the seats meet the bulkhead, made from some scrap teak I had got hold of. Mixing the epoxy was easy as it was a 50:50 mix and as the weather was cool it stayed workable for some time. I used some lining wallpaper to plan out how the strips should be cut and placed. The Teak was cut to size and gauged by using the plan I also cut some thin strips of teak to 5mm square by 20mm long to use as spacers, using the off cuts. Once happy, I mixed the epoxy and spread it on the fibre glass, then placed the cut strips in place using the a couple of spacers to keep the strips parallel. Once complete the wood needed to be weighed down whilst the epoxy set. I used house bricks covered in Duct tape or any other tape I could lay my hands on, this was to protect the wood and prevent any brick dust or muck falling into the epoxy. After a couple of days I could move to the next piece (needed the bricks). I used the internet to research using the Caulking, some useful Youtube videos out there. Then calked the all of the seating, following the instructional videos. The seats came up a treat and are still looking good today. Again it wasn't a difficult job (apart from removing the original ply). The people at Moodys estimated how much epoxy and how many tubes of caulking I would need for the amount of strips I ordered. By drawing up each of the seat on paper I could measure how much teak I needed. The only thing to note here is that you should cut all the longest pieces first! The strips came in I think 2 or 2.4 m lengths so there is a bit of a game finding the best fit of lengths to cut out of a strip so that you do not leave much waste. Again the time and investment by doing it myself saved thousands of pounds.
Petef
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jul 02, 2013 2:55 pm
Boat type: Dehler 39 J&V


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